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Egg Cream

Egg Cream
Egg Cream is a classic non-alcoholic beverage originated in Brooklyn, New York City in late 19th century by a candy shop owner named Louis Auster. It contains neither eggs nor cream and is usually composed of chocolate syrup (Almost always Fox's U-bet chocolate syrup in New York), milk, and seltzer (soda water).

As the inventor's grandson Stanley Auster says, the origins of the name of the drink are lost in time. One of the versions is that "Egg" is an interpretation of the Yiddish word "Echt" which means "genuine". So, according to this theory, the drink was originally called "good cream" or something like it. Another version is that the drink has been called so due to large variety of egg-based fountain/dessert drinks available at that time, so the author wanted to capitalize on the name.

Egg Creams are almost always made with chocolate syrup but sometimes they can be requested in other flavors, mainly vanilla and strawberry.

The drink's ingredients are required to be mixed shortly before consumption to achieve the best taste. That is why even though there were several attempts (mainly unsuccessful) to bottle the beverage it is almost exclusively a fountain drink. Egg Cream was often described as a "poor man's ice cream soda" due to its similar overall flavor but much cheaper cost - usually the beverage was only a bit more expensive than a regular fountain soda.

To make an egg cream fill a ¾ full with seltzer soda water, add 1 or 2 ounces of chocolate syrup and a little milk or cream to fill the glass, stir it and enjoy the beverage. However, the genuine recipe is still unknown. One legend says that when Louis Auster refused a low price for the recipe offered him by a national ice cream chain, the company's executive offended him with an anti-Semitic statement. The inventor then decided not to sell the recipe and take it to his grave. His grandson claims not to know the recipe either.



 


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